Free information on ADD/ADHD in teens

The internet is full of free information about teen ADD and ADHD teenagers. How can parents learn to find this information. Sure, you could search Google, MSN or Yahoo but you end up with ten million pages about ADD and ADHD and none of them are really answering your questions. There are several seemingly credible sources of information out there whose messages, advice and information conflict with what your friends, relatives and family doctor are telling you. How can parents be reliable and provide helpful information about ADD and ADHD in teens without spending a fortune consulting with a thousand different experts?

If you’re reading a personal story or a blog, consider the fact that the story you’re reading is a parent’s perception of their experiences, and allow for the fact that there may be coincidences, and that when a family is using a variety of different approaches, they can’t logically attribute success to any one treatment option. In short, you can do everything that they’re doing and not have the same results. There are genetic, nutritional, neurological and environmental factors that can all contribute to teen ADD and ADHD.

Be wary of seemingly helpful material, disguised as free information, distributed by drug companies, whose strategically written language will convince you that their newest ADD drugs will cure everything and you’ll all live happily ever after, like the joyful families pictured in their ads. That’s not free information, that’s a clever way to convince people to buy your product.

Look specifically for experts that have devoted large chunks of their lives to researching ADD or studying psychology, or counseling. The credible ones will be the ones who have loved ones with ADD or ADHD. Some of them will even have personal experiences, having suffered from ADD as a teen or child.

Practitioners who are actively involved in the treatment and counseling of families and teens with ADHD or ADD are also reliable sources. It’s a difficult career and these people devote a lot of their free time to reading about the issues and latest research and statistics in the field. Additionally, they’re attending conferences and having often daily interaction with ADD and ADHD teens and their families.

Look specifically for counselors and behavioral therapists who have practical experiences with a variety of approaches and have been able to use them in a clinical setting. Many of the best experts end up teaching at an alternative school for ADHD and on the board of directors at an ADD school. Keep your eyes open for personalized information for free, sometimes you can find online assessments and free consultations. Don’t worry about financial issues, be up front about your situation because if they really know their stuff they’ll be able to get you headed in the right direction, either by referring you to other free resources, resources within your means, helpful books to read or websites, or practitioners in your budget. Free information about ADHD and ADD in teens is easy to find, just be sure that you know where to look!

Here are additional resources you might be interested in:

ADHD Boarding School Information

What are the symptoms of ADHD disorder in children?